October Constellations


The ideas of constellations is a completely celestial and abstract concept all and of its own, however what is even more mind boggling for some is that these constellations come and go in correspondence to the time of year and even the month. Specifically for the month of October, there are a total of seven; however, only two of these constellations have deep sky objects; Aquarius having two global clusters and one open one, while Pegasus consisting of only one single one. However, the other five are more than remarkable; here is a list of the seven constellations of October:

• Aquarius
It is visible in the northern hemisphere during fall and in the southern hemisphere during spring and it represents a man pouring water from a bucket. The right ascension is about 22.71 hours and the declination is about negative 10.19 degrees. The area is about 980 square degrees and it crosses the meridian on October 10, at around 9 PM. There are 10 points of interest in Aquarius. M2- Globular Star Cluster, M73- Open Star Cluster, M72- Globular Star Cluster, Sadalmelik- Lucky Star of the King, Sadalsuud- Luck of Lucks, Sadalachbia- Lucky Star of the Tents, Skat- Leg, Albali- The Drinker, Ancha- Hip Bone and Situla.

• Cepheus
Cepheus is visible all year in the northern hemisphere. It was named after the king of Ethiopia and also was the husband of Cassiopeia and the father of Andromeda. The right ascension is about 22.52 hours and the declination is about 71.59 degrees. The area is about 588 square degrees and it crosses the meridian on October 15, at around 9 PM. There are 6 Points of Interest in Cepheus. Alderamin- Right Forearm, Alfirk- Flock, Alrai- Shepherd, Herschel's Garnet Star, Alkurhah, and Al Kalb al Rai.

• Grus
Grus is visible from July through September in latitudes south of 33 degrees north. It was named by Johann Bayer and was named after the crane, which was the symbol for the office of astronomer in ancient Egypt. The right ascension is about 22.61 hours and the declination is about negative 44.52 degrees. The area is 366 square degrees and it crosses the meridian on October10 at 9 PM. There is only one point of interest in Grus, which is Alnair, the bright.

• Lacerta
It extends from the head of Cepheus to the foot of Perseus, between Cygnus and Andromeda. It is one of seven constellations created by Johannes Hevelius in the 17th century. The right ascension is 22.46 hours and declination is 44.82 degrees. The area is about 201 square degrees and it crosses the meridian on October 10, at 9 PM. There is no point of interest in Lacerta.

• Octans
It is visible in latitudes south of the equator all night long and it contains the South Celestial Pole. It is named after the octant, a navigational tool used to locate Polaris. The right ascension is 21.31 hours and the declination is negative 83.76 degrees. The area is 291 square degrees and it crosses the meridian on September 20 at 9 PM. There is only one point of interest in Octans, which is Polaris Australis, the Southern Pole.

• Pegasus
It is visible from August to December and represents the son of Neptune and Medusa who eventually became the thundering horse of Zeus and the carrier of his lightning bolts. The right ascension is 22.75 hours and the declination is 19.53 degrees. The area is 1121 square degrees and it crosses the meridian on October 20 at 9 PM. There are 9 points of interest in Pegasus. M45- Globular Star Cluster, Markab- The Thing for Riding On, Scheat- Leg, Algenib- Flank, Enif- Nose, Homam- The High-minded Man, Matar- Rain, Baham- Livestock, and Salm.

• Piscis Austrinus
It is visible in latitudes south of 53 degrees north from July through September. It is represented as a fish lying on its back drinking the waters pouring from the jar of Aquarius. The right ascension is 22.29 hours and declination is negative 30.66 degrees. The area is 245 square degrees and it crosses the meridian on October 10 at 9 PM. It has one point of interest, which is Fomalhaut, the Mouth of the Fish.




Featured:
Daily Moon Horoscope
Twitter | Facebook | Google+ | Contact Us | Terms of Use